The Age of Petty Tyrannies

In jos

The Age of Petty Tyrannies

Mesaj Scris de Admin la data de Mier Mai 16, 2018 7:23 pm

The Age of Petty Tyrannies
By John W. Whitehead
May 16, 2018 "Information Clearing House" -  We labor today under the weight of countless tyrannies, large and small, carried out in the name of the national good by an elite class of government officials who are largely insulated from the ill effects of their actions, and inflicted on an overtaxed, overregulated, and underrepresented populace.
Consider, for example, that federal and state governments now require on penalty of a fine that individuals apply for permission before they can grow exotic orchids, host elaborate dinner parties, gather friends in one’s home for Bible studies, give coffee to the homeless, let their kids manage a lemonade stand, keep chickens as pets, or braid someone’s hair, as ludicrous as that may seem.
A current case before the Supreme Court, Niang v. Tomblinson, strikes at the heart of this bureaucratic exercise in absurdity that has pushed overregulation and overcriminalization to outrageous limits. This particular case is about whether one needs a government license in order to braid hair.
Missouri, like many states across the country, has increasingly adopted as its governing style the authoritarian notion that the government knows best and therefore must control, regulate and dictate almost everything about the citizenry’s public, private and professional lives.
In Missouri, anyone wanting to braid African-style hair and charge for it must first acquire a government license, which at a minimum requires the applicant to undertake at least 1500 hours of cosmetology classes costing tens of thousands of dollars. Tennessee has fined residents nearly $100,000 just for violating its laws against braiding hair without a government license.
It’s not just hair braiding that has become grist for the overregulation mill.
Almost every aspect of American life today—especially if it is work-related—is subject to this kind of heightened scrutiny and ham-fisted control, whether you’re talking about aspiring “bakers, braiders, casket makers, florists, veterinary masseuses, tour guides, taxi drivers, eyebrow threaders, teeth whiteners, and more.”
For instance, whereas 70 years ago, one out of every 20 U.S. jobs required a state license, today, almost 1 in 3 American occupations requires a license.
The problem of overregulation has become so bad that, as one analyst notes, “getting a license to style hair in Washington takes more instructional time than becoming an emergency medical technicianor a firefighter.”
This is what happens when bureaucrats run the show, and the rule of law becomes little more than a cattle prod for forcing the citizenry to march in lockstep with the government.
Overregulation is just the other side of the coin to overcriminalization, that phenomenon in which everything is rendered illegal and everyone becomes a lawbreaker.
This is the mindset that tried to penalize a fisherman with 20 years’ jail time for throwing fish that were too small back into the water and subjected a 90-year-old man to arrest for violating an ordinance that prohibits feeding the homeless in public.
It’s no coincidence that both of these incidents—the fishing debacle and the homeless feeding arrest—happened in Florida.
Despite its pristine beaches and balmy temperatures, Florida is no less immune to the problems plaguing the rest of the nation in terms of over criminalization, incarceration rates, bureaucracy, corruption, and police misconduct. 
In fact, the Sunshine State has become a poster child for how a seemingly idyllic place can be transformed into a police state with very little effort. As such, it is representative of what is happening in every state across the nation, where a steady diet of bread and circuses has given rise to an oblivious, inactive citizenry content to be ruled over by an inflexible and highly bureaucratic regime.
Just a few years back, in fact, Florida officials authorized police raids on barber shops in minority communities, resulting in barbers being handcuffed in front of customers, and their shops searched without warrants. All of this was purportedly done in an effort to make sure that the barbers’ licensing paperwork was up to snuff.
As if criminalizing fishing, charity, parenting decisions, and haircuts wasn’t bad enough, you could also find yourself passing time in a Florida slammer for such inane activities as singing in a public place while wearing a swimsuit, breaking more than three dishes per day, [url=http://books.google.com/books?id=pgGmabMLYQcC&pg=PT211&lpg=PT211&dq=florida+illegal+to+fart+in+a+public+place&source=bl&ots=Oc34uz3r7J&sig=s3S7kyYdUpsZWDqvKqeERxZDG-A&hl=en&sa=X&ei=Zb9gVI-sPIGVNqDMgOgL&ved=0CDcQ6AEwBDgU#v=onepage&q=florida illegal to fart in a public]farting in a public place after 6 pm on a Thursday[/url], and skateboarding without a license.
This transformation of the United States from being a beacon of freedom to a locked down nation illustrates perfectly what songwriter Joni Mitchell was referring to when she wailed, “They paved paradise and put up a parking lot.”
Only in our case, sold on the idea that safety, security and material comforts are preferable to freedom, we’ve allowed the government to pave over the Constitution in order to erect a concentration camp. 
The problem with these devil’s bargains, however, is that there is always a catch, always a price to pay for whatever it is we valued so highly as to barter away our most precious possessions.
We’ve bartered away our right to self-governance, self-defense, privacy, autonomy and that most important right of all—the right to tell the government to “leave me the hell alone.”
In exchange for the promise of safe streets, safe schools, blight-free neighborhoods, lower taxes, lower crime rates, and readily accessible technology, health care, water, food and power, we’ve opened the door to militarized police, government surveillance, asset forfeiture, school zero tolerance policies, license plate readers, red light cameras, SWAT team raids, health care mandates, overcriminalization, overregulation and government corruption.
In the end, such bargains always turn sour.
As I make clear in my book Battlefield America: The War on the American People, this is what happens when the American people get duped, deceived, double-crossed, cheated, lied to, swindled and conned into believing that the government and its army of bureaucrats—the people we appointed to safeguard our freedoms—actually have our best interests at heart.
Yet when all is said and done, who is really to blame when the wool gets pulled over your eyes: you, for believing the con man, or the con man for being true to his nature?
It’s time for a bracing dose of reality, America.
Wake up and take a good, hard look around you, and ask yourself if the gussied-up version of America being sold to you—crime free, worry free and devoid of responsibility—is really worth the ticket price: nothing less than your freedoms.
Constitutional attorney and author John W. Whitehead is founder and president of The Rutherford Institute. His new book Battlefield America: The War on the American People  (SelectBooks, 2015) is available online at www.amazon.com. Whitehead can be contacted at johnw@rutherford.org.

Vârsta copiilor tirani

De John W. Whitehead

16 mai 2018 "Casa de informare a informațiilor" - Lucrăm astăzi sub ponderea nenumăratelor tiranii, mari și mici, desfășurate în numele bunului național de către o clasă de elită a oficialilor guvernamentali izolați în mare măsură de efectele lor rele acțiuni și provocate de o populație suprasolicitat, suprareglată și subreprezentată.

Luați în considerare, de exemplu, că guvernele federale și de stat cer acum cu amendă amendă că persoanele solicită permisiunea înainte ca acestea să poată crește orhidee exotice, să găzduiască petreceri elaborate, să adune prietenii în casă pentru studii biblice, să dea cafea celor fără adăpost, copiii lor gestionează un stand de limonadă, păstrează puii ca animale de companie sau împletesc părul cuiva, la fel de ridicol cum ar părea.

Un caz în fața Curții Supreme, Niang v. Tomblinson, lovește în centrul acestui exercițiu birocratic în absurditate care a împins suprareglementarea și supracriminalizarea la limite scandaloase. Acest caz special se referă la necesitatea unei licențe guvernamentale pentru împletirea părului.

Missouri, ca multe state din întreaga țară, a adoptat din ce în ce mai mult ca stil de conducere ideea autoritară că guvernul știe cel mai bine și, prin urmare, trebuie să controleze, să reglementeze și să dicteze aproape totul despre viețile publice, private și profesionale ale cetățenilor.

În Missouri, oricine dorește să împletească părul în stil african și să-l taxeze, trebuie să obțină mai întâi o licență guvernamentală, care solicită cel puțin 1500 de ore de cursuri de cosmetologie care costă zeci de mii de dolari. Tennessee a amendat rezidenții aproape 100.000 de dolari numai pentru încălcarea legilor sale împotriva părului de împletit fără permis de guvern.

Nu este vorba numai de împletiturile de păr, care au devenit mizerie pentru moara de suprareglare.

Aproape fiecare aspect al vieții americane de astăzi - mai ales dacă se referă la muncă - este supus unui astfel de control sporit și al controlului fermei, indiferent dacă vorbim despre aspiranții "brutari, broderi, producători de sicrie, florariști, ghiduri turistice, șoferi de taxi, fire de sprancene, albăreți de dinți și multe altele. "

De exemplu, în timp ce acum 70 de ani, una din cele 20 de locuri de muncă din SUA necesită o licență de stat, în prezent aproape 1 din trei ocupații americane necesită o licență.

Problema supraregulării a devenit atât de rea încât, după cum observă un analist, "obținerea unei licențe pentru stilul părului din Washington necesită mai mult timp de instruire decât să devină un tehnician medical de urgență sau un pompier".

Așa se întâmplă atunci când birocrații conduc emisiunea, iar statul de drept devine puțin mai mult decât o bovină pentru a forța cetățenii să se mute cu un guvern.

Overregulation este doar cealaltă parte a monedei față de supracriminalizare, acel fenomen în care totul devine ilegal și toată lumea devine un pionier.

Aceasta este mentalitatea care a încercat să pedepsească un pescar cu o pedeapsă de 20 de ani de închisoare pentru a arunca peștii prea mici înapoi în apă și a supus unui om de 90 de ani să fie arestat pentru încălcarea unei ordonanțe care interzice hrănirea persoanelor fără adăpost în public.

Nu este o coincidență faptul că ambele incidente - dezastrul pescuitului și arestul de hrană fără adăpost - au avut loc în Florida.

În ciuda plajelor sale curate și a temperaturilor vii, Florida nu este mai puțin imună față de problemele care afectează restul națiunii în ceea ce privește criminalizarea, ratele de încarcerare, birocrația, corupția și conduita necorespunzătoare a poliției.

De fapt, statul Sunshine a devenit un poster pentru modul în care un loc aparent idilic poate fi transformat într-un stat de poliție cu foarte puține eforturi. Ca atare, este reprezentativ pentru ceea ce se întâmplă în fiecare stat din întreaga națiune, unde o dietă echilibrată de pâine și de circuri a dat naștere unui conținut de cetățeni nevăzuți, inactivi, de a fi condus de un regim inflexibil și foarte birocratic.

Doar câțiva ani în urmă, oficialii din Florida au autorizat raiduri de poliție la frizerii din comunitățile minoritare, rezultând că frizerii au fost încătuși în fața clienților și că magazinele lor au căutat fără mandate. Toate acestea au fost făcute într-un efort de a se asigura că hârtiile de licențiere ale barbierilor au fost în mână.

Ca și cum ar fi fost criminalizarea pescuitului, a carității, a deciziilor de părinți și a tunsorilor nu a fost destul de rău, ai putea să te treci și pe timp de vară într-un slammer din Florida pentru astfel de activități inofensive ca cântând într-un loc public în timp ce purta un costum de baie, zi, furting într-un loc public după o joi la ora 18 și skateboarding fără licență.

Această transformare a Statelor Unite de a fi un far de libertate într-o națiune închisă ilustrează perfect ceea ce compozitorul Joni Mitchell se referea când a strigat: "Au pavat paradisul și au pus un loc de parcare".



Numai în cazul nostru, vândut pe ideea că siguranța, securitatea și confortul materialului sunt preferate libertății, am permis guvernului să deschidă Constituția pentru a se ridica
avatar
Admin
Admin

Mesaje : 4551
Data de înscriere : 05/11/2012

Vezi profilul utilizatorului http://amintiridespreviitor.forumgratuit.ro

Sus In jos

Sus


 
Permisiunile acestui forum:
Nu puteti raspunde la subiectele acestui forum